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Blog — Antioxidant

Is Your Nail Polish Healthy?

Posted by Pure Manna International on

The recent study, conducted by researchers at Duke University and the Environmental Working Group (EWG), tested the urine of 26 women who had recently painted their nails. It found traces of Triphenyl Phosphate (TPHP), in every participant. What’s TPHP? TPHP is a chemical commonly used to make plastics and fire retardants in foam furniture. In nail polish, it’s used to provide flexibility to the product. TPHP is a chemical known to disrupt hormone function by mucking with our endocrine system, affecting a variety of vital functions, including reproduction. Plus, it specifically and significantly interacts with a protein which is central to regulating our metabolism...

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Why Your Body Needs Antioxidant Support

Posted by Pure Manna International on

Antioxidants - Why You Need 'Em What Are Antioxidants? Antioxidants fight the oxidation process, a chemical reaction that can cause damage to many cells in your body. While there are many ways to describe what antioxidants do inside the body, one definition of antioxidants is any substance that inhibits oxidation, especially one used to counteract the deterioration of stored food products or removes potentially damaging oxidizing agents in a living organism. Antioxidants include dozens of food-based substances you may have heard of before, such as carotenoids like beta-carotene, lycopene and vitamin C. These are several examples of antioxidants that inhibit oxidation, or reactions promoted by oxygen, peroxides and/or free radicals...

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Why Antioxidants Are So Important

Posted by Pure Manna International on

Oxidation is the cause of free radicals. This happens when an electron is knocked out of a chemical bond. These highly reactive free radicals will interact with and damage healthy molecules. Antioxidants can reverse the effects of oxidation, by way of anti-oxidation. Antioxidant is essentially the exact opposite of oxidation, in that antioxidant molecules have electrons to spare.
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